Hawaii’s governor describes the 53 fire fatalities as a “heartbreaking day.”

Hawaii's governor describes the 53 fire fatalities as a "heartbreaking day."

53 dead have so far been found in total, and more deaths are anticipated.
Authorities think that roughly 1000 people are missing, but they are not precisely how many, and downed communication lines are making it difficult to find them.
Following the burning of hundreds of homes, primarily in the western beach town of Laihana, thousands of residents have been forced to relocate.
According to the fire authorities, none of the current flames are completely contained.
But according to Hawaii’s governor, this is already “likely the largest disaster in state history.”

He demanded that there be 2,000 rooms set up for evacuees and that any available residents offer shelter.
Additionally, evacuees have been advised not to return home because of the unstable situations and dangerous fire zones.

‘Survivors had to run for their life,’ said a meteorologist in Maui.

A Maui-based television station’s Malika Dudley, a meteorologist, told BBC Breakfast about the dire scenario.

She had spoken to a woman who had leapt off a seawall and spent seven hours in the water to get away from the flames. The woman claimed that her neighbor perished in the water just next to her.

Another woman reported seeing bodies in burned-out cars as people attempted to flee Lahaina.

As we start to hear from these survivors who had to practically flee for their lives, Dudley remarked, “It’s a truly dire scenario.

While residents are “still very much on edge” in other parts of the island, she had just learned that her home is still standing.

What has been going on?

Significant flames are still raging over Maui, and the nearby Big Island is also dealing with fires, but authorities claim they are under control.

What you should know if you’re just joining us is as follows:

Hawaii’s governor described the flames as the “largest natural disaster in Hawaii state history” and claimed that 80% of the historic town of Lahaina is “gone” in a press conference that was held in the previous few hours.
53 bodies have been found in all. Governor Josh Green forewarned: “We will continue to see loss of life.”

Authorities estimate that there are still 1,000 persons missing, however many may be impossible to reach because of communication breakdowns.
In the western town of Lahaina, the fire spread so swiftly that residents had no choice but to jump into the ocean to escape the flames.
According to fire officials, none of the fires on Maui are completely out, and the situation is still hazardous and unpredictable.
On the western side of the island, 11,000 people are without electricity and tens of thousands of tourists have been evacuated.
The federal government will give cash for rescue efforts and recuperation since President Joe Biden classified the fires a major disaster.

If you just joined us, here is a recap of the news briefing on the escalating crisis on Maui, which lasted for more than an hour:

Family from Kansas was compelled to dive into the water in Lahaina

I previously met with Tee Dang, a mother of three, who leaped into the ocean with her children to flee the fires in Laihana.

Dang claimed that her family parted ways in the sea because they were all confident they would perish.

Her daughter eventually passed out in the water.

We observed a firefighter arrive. I said, “I have a child,” as he was helping people up. I am a parent,” she declared.

I don’t even know whether we’re going to make it at this point, the firefighter told the group of 15 to 20 survivors he was leading. Just follow my instructions. Upon my command, jump. If I order you to go, leave.

Once because the fires threatened the initial refuge, and again because the shelter was short on medical supplies at the time.

She is visiting Hawaii on vacation from Kansas and claims that her family has been to Oahu before. Now that her ordeal is done, she is eager to return home and start the process of healing.

scenario with fire in Maui and the Big Island

Wildfires are still raging across the central island of Maui and to a lesser extent on Hawaii’s Big Island as we approach the end of their third day.

The fire was particularly severe on Maui’s western shore, where it completely destroyed the well-known tourist destination of Lahaina and hundreds of residences.

According to officials, that fire is currently roughly 80% suppressed.

The Pulehu fire in the island’s center has been 70% suppressed. A third fire in Upcountry Maui is still being investigated by officials.

There are at least three significant fires on the neighboring Big Island as well, but authorities declared them contained on Thursday.

Lahaina is depicted in other images as burnt ruins.

Residents of Lahaina run to evacuation centers

I’ve just arrived at the War Memorial Stadium, which is serving as a refuge for the evacuees who are still pouring into the island of Maui. At least 100 automobiles are lined up from the entrance.

Air mattresses have taken over the gym and the shade outside, and volunteers are assisting guests with check-in and locating spots to rest.

Local delights like shaved ice are being given out while traditional Hawaiian music is playing. Additionally available are complimentary massages and acupuncture.

Doctors have been arriving and departing, offering medical assistance, and even Oprah, a famous TV star who resides in Maui, has stopped over.

Tom Leonard, who is depicted here, has spent 44 years calling Lahaina home. He lost everything and has been residing at the stadium for the past two days without knowing where he will go next.

“Over there, nothing is left. It will require many years.

What we discovered in that update

If you just joined us, here is a recap of the news briefing on the escalating crisis on Maui, which lasted for more than an hour:

53 dead have so far been found in total, and more deaths are anticipated.
Authorities think that roughly 1000 people are missing, but they are not precisely how many, and downed communication lines are making it difficult to find them.
Following the burning of hundreds of homes, primarily in the western beach resort of Lahauna, thousands of residents have been forced to relocate.
According to the fire authorities, none of the current flames are completely contained.
But according to Hawaii’s governor, this is already “likely the largest disaster in state history.”

He demanded that there be 2,000 rooms set up for evacuees and that any available residents offer shelter.
Additionally, evacuees have been advised not to return home because of the unstable situations and dangerous fire zones.

The press conference is over.

The news conference with officials is now over. As the recovery process progresses, they have committed to giving “routine” updates.

We’ll give you a quick rundown of what we just discovered.

The police chief reports that 53 people have died.

When questioned about varying counts of the total deceased, Maui Police Chief John Pelletier responded, “We’ve recovered 53 people.”

As the county had earlier stated, this implies that 53 deaths have been officially confirmed in Lahaina.

“It’s not accurate unless I give you that number or the mayor,” he replied.

“We’re going to take our time and do it correctly.

“I don’t know what the total will be in the end. The outcome will be terrible and dreadful.

It’ll be a brand-new Lahaina,

When asked how long the recovery process would take, Governor Green responded that Lahaina, the fire’s epicenter on the western side of the island of Maui, would need a long time to reconstruct.

You’ll be shocked, he remarked, when you realize how much of Lahaina was destroyed.

“Virtually all of those structures will need to be rebuilt. It will be a new Lahaina that Maui creates in its own likeness and according to its own principles.

He continued by saying the price will be in the “billions of dollars”.

Additionally, he added that when Lahaina is rebuilt, fire safety will need to be taken into account given how global warming affects wildfires.

Nearly 1,000 people remain unaccounted for.

The police chief claims that although it is unknown exactly how many individuals are missing, he believes that it is probably over 1,000.

John Pelletier added, “That doesn’t mean that’s how many… that have passed,” adding that many might be in shelters or just unable to be reached.

Many individuals on the island don’t have access to electricity or the internet, which makes it harder to find people.

“None of the fires are 100% contained,” the fire chief said.

According to fire chief Brad Ventura, the numerous big fires that have been blazing over Maui since Tuesday have consumed hundreds of acres.

“At this time, none of the fires are completely contained.”

Additionally, a lot of little fires have started, causing firemen to “triage” their resources to put out all the fires.

Ventura warned people to avoid the fire zones since the situation is still hazardous.

It’s still quite dangerous; things are falling all around us every minute, and some people have been harmed.

The mayor urges citizens to delay their return to their homes.

Richard Bissen, the mayor of the County of Maui, spoke to residents who had evacuated but whose homes had not been affected by the fires.

I understand that you’re wondering when you may return to your house, he continued.

Wait until “we have recovered those who have perished,” he exhorts.

Before letting residents back into their houses, Bissen asks that they please give us time to finish this process.

Some of the people I haven’t heard from are:

He was listening to the radio when I spoke to him.

He claims he’s trying to get his mind off things and doesn’t want to listen to the governor’s news conference.

On Front Street in Lahaina, he claims, “I found two bodies floating against my sea wall.”

When I ask him if any of his family members had perished in the fires, he replies, “There are a few people I haven’t heard from.”

housing for thousands of people, says Green

Governor Green claims that hundreds of homes have been destroyed and that the thousands of displaced individuals will need accommodation.

They will contact hotels in search of 2,000 rooms initially to accommodate them. Green, however, also urged everyone on the island of Maui who had a spare room to make their house available.

“Please think about bringing those people into your lives if you have additional space in your home or the ability to house someone,” Green said.

The press conference is over.

The news conference with officials is now over. As the recovery process progresses, they have committed to giving “routine” updates.

We’ll give you a quick rundown of what we just discovered.

The police chief reports that 53 people have died.

When questioned about varying counts of the total deceased, Maui Police Chief John Pelletier responded, “We’ve recovered 53 people.”

As the county had earlier stated, this implies that 53 deaths have been officially confirmed in Lahaina.

“It’s not accurate unless I give you that number or the mayor,” he replied.

“We’re going to take our time and do it correctly.

“I don’t know what the total will be in the end. The outcome will be terrible and dreadful.

It’ll be a brand-new Lahaina,

When asked how long the recovery process would take, Governor Green responded that Lahaina, the fire’s epicenter on the western side of the island of Maui, would need a long time to reconstruct.

You’ll be shocked, he remarked, when you realize how much of Lahaina was destroyed.

“Virtually all of those structures will need to be rebuilt. It will be a new Lahaina that Maui creates in its own likeness and according to its own principles.

He continued by saying the price will be in the “billions of dollars”.

Additionally, he added that when Lahaina is rebuilt, fire safety will need to be taken into account given how global warming affects wildfires.

BREAKING

Nearly 1,000 people remain unaccounted for.
The police chief claims that although it is unknown exactly how many individuals are missing, he believes that it is probably over 1,000.

John Pelletier added, “That doesn’t mean that’s how many… that have passed,” adding that many might be in shelters or just unable to be reached.

Many individuals on the island don’t have access to electricity or the internet, which makes it harder to find people.

“None of the fires are 100% contained,” the fire chief said.

According to fire chief Brad Ventura, the numerous big fires that have been blazing over Maui since Tuesday have consumed hundreds of acres.

“At this time, none of the fires are completely contained.”

Additionally, a lot of little fires have started, causing firemen to “triage” their resources to put out all the fires.

Ventura warned people to avoid the fire zones since the situation is still hazardous.

It’s still quite dangerous; things are falling all around us every minute, and some people have been harmed.

The mayor urges citizens to delay their return to their homes.

Richard Bissen, the mayor of the County of Maui, spoke to residents who had evacuated but whose homes had not been affected by the fires.

I understand that you’re wondering when you may return to your house, he continued.

Wait until “we have recovered those who have perished,” he exhorts.

Before letting residents back into their houses, Bissen asks that they please give us time to finish this process.

Some of the people I haven’t heard from are:

On the island of Maui, I’m at a shelter.

He was listening to the radio when I spoke to him.

He claims he’s trying to get his mind off things and doesn’t want to listen to the governor’s news conference.

On Front Street in Lahaina, he claims, “I found two bodies floating against my sea wall.”

When I ask him if any of his family members had perished in the fires, he replies, “There are a few people I haven’t heard from.”

Thousands will need housing – Green

Hundreds of homes have been destroyed and Governor Green says the thousands of people displaced are going to need housing.

They are initially seeking 2,000 rooms to accommodate them, and will reach out to hotels. But Green also called for anyone with spare rooms across the island of Maui to open up their homes.

“If you have additional space in your home, if you have the capacity to house somebody… please consider bringing those people into your lives,” Green said.

Largest natural disaster in the state’s recorded history

The “largest natural disaster in Hawaii state history,” according to Governor Green, are the flames.

He asserts that “the number [of deaths] has been rising and we will continue to see loss of life”

According to him, hundreds of homes were destroyed.

That will require a lot of time to recover from. But… we’ll win, says Green.

Update on Maui fires from Hawaii officials

Officials from Hawaii will give an update on the Maui wildfires in a short while. The time now is 15:30 local time.

In addition to learning more about the ongoing search and rescue operations in and around the town of Lahaina, we hope to receive the most recent death toll information.

As we update you, keep reading.

the governor of Hawaii posts a video from Lahaina

Josh Green, the governor of Hawaii, is seen standing in front of Lahaina’s burned-out buildings.

He describes it as “extraordinary.” “It is tragically gone,” he continued, adding that perhaps more than 1,000 structures had been destroyed.

Green continues by predicting a spike in the death toll.

He and other officials will soon update us on the most recent information regarding the flames and its aftermath.

Maui wildfires are visible in satellite images.

The size of the Maui wildfires is depicted in a satellite image published by NASA.

The infrared photo was taken on Tuesday, August 8 at 22:25 local time with a camera intended for tracking Earth’s surface temperatures.

An extensive coastal fire that covers the town of Lahaina may be seen on the left of the image. Near the town of Kihei, there is also a second sizable fire visible.

Rise in the number of water rescues

17 people have reportedly been pulled from the water off the Hawaiian island town of Lahaina, according to the Coast Guard.

Many locals were caught off guard by how quickly the fire spread through the town, and some were compelled to jump into the Pacific Ocean to flee the flames.

who spent over four hours in the sea with her three kids while the fire raged.

Another 40 survivors had been found on the strand and saved by boat personnel, according to a statement from the Coast Guard.

It claimed that 13 planes had been used to conduct searches over 689 square nautical miles (2360 square kilometers), with the help of five helicopters deployed by the Department of Defense.

BREAKING
53 people have died so far.
Local authorities have reported that 53 people have died as a result of the Lahaina fire.

As of Thursday at noon local time, 17 more fatalities had been officially confirmed, bringing the total to 36, according to a from the County of Maui.

The fire was still reportedly active.

California will dispatch teams for search and rescue.

California, a state more frequently affected by wildfires than Hawaii, is sending search and rescue teams to assist in the recovery process, according to its governor, Gavin Newsom.

He wrote on X, formerly known as Twitter, “We stand with the people of Maui and all Hawaiians amid these horrific wildfires that have claimed lives and destroyed the historic town of Lahaina.”

The devastating impact of catastrophic wildfires fueled by climate change, capable of destroying entire communities and centuries’ worth of irreplaceable history and heritage, is something that Californians are all too familiar with.

Since the 2018 Camp Fire in northern California, which claimed 85 lives and mostly destroyed the town of Paradise, the Lahaina fire is the deadliest in the US.

chatbeet home